Student work

Daniel Sharp

Sharp proposes modification and adaptation of existing structures to frame vistas and provide containment.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Daniel Sharp

Sharp proposes modification and adaptation of existing structures to frame vistas and provide containment.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Joanne Mun

Mun proposes an urban playground where the public domain becomes a venue for individual and programmed activity.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Joanne Mun

Mun proposes an urban playground where the public domain becomes a venue for individual and programmed activity.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Mike Harris

Harris’s proposal sees the Horwood Avenue Civic link as a spine changing in scale, enclosure and character.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Mike Harris

Precendent Study for the River Foreshore

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Ghazal Zolghadr

Zolghadr proposes a series of green mid-block oases, which provide respite from the main streets and lead to an extensive river park, active both day and night.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Ghazal Zolghadr

Zolghadr proposes a series of green mid-block oases, which provide respite from the main streets and lead to an extensive river park, active both day and night.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Krista McMaster

McMaster sees the Horwood Avenue Civic Link as a high density pedestrian spine with commercial offices on either side.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Krista McMaster

McMaster sees the Horwood Avenue Civic Link as a high density pedestrian spine with commercial offices on either side.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Christiane Whiteley

Whiteley proposes to double the number of active frontages by utilising the inside faces of city blocks.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

Christiane Whiteley

The growth in population of residents and workers should make the smaller lanes viable.

Introduction to the Student Work

Rod Simpson

As part of Design Parramatta; the urban design studio at the University of Sydney developed alternative designs for Horwood Avenue; the civic link. This project was selected not only because it may link the rail station to the river, but also because the avenue occupies a middle ground between the concentration of large offices to the east and the highly modified historic subdivision ‘grain’ around Church Street to the west. With its ‘cranked’ alignment, modernist car parking structures and tendency to branch off to other smaller random spaces occupied by small business ventures, Horwood Avenue can also be seen as the location of two distinct and misaligned urban processes; the planned and the unplanned.

Design Propositions

Both professional and student work explored the notion that the ‘first city’ grid of rectilinear streets with consistent street frontages could be complemented and contrasted with a ‘second city’ of lanes and irregular diverse spaces. The urban design studio explored this concept and showed that the theme could be developed in a number of ways.

  • DanielSharp
  • Daniel-Sharp-12
  • Daniel Sharp 2
  • JoanneMun
  • Joanne Mun 1
  • Joanne-Mun-2
  • MikeHarris
  • Mike Harris 1
  • Mike Harris 2
  • GhazalZolghadr
  • Ghazal Zolghadr 1
  • Ghazal Zolghadr 2
  • KristaMcMaster
  • Krista McMaster 1. Spine
  • Krista McMaster 2
  • ChristianeWhiteley
  • Whiteley 1
  • Whiteley 2